Abstract
Abstract

National Journal of Community Medicine

Original Article

Year: 2022 | Volume: 13 | Issue: 4 | Page No: 224-228

Assessment of Epidemiological Factors in a Cholera Outbreak in an Urban Area of Western India

Author: Divyangkumar N Patel1, Mehul R Patel2, Bhautik P Modi3, Jaydip Vidja4

Affiliation:

1Associate Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Dr. N. D. Desai Faculty of Medical Science and Research, Nadiad

2Assistant Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Dr. N. D. Desai Faculty of Medical Science and Research, Nadiad

3Assistant Professor, Department of Community Medicine and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Science, Rajkot

4Assistant Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Dr. N. D. Desai Faculty of Medical Science and Research, Nadiad

Abstract:

Background: Cholera is a preventable disease, still it remains a major public health problem among developing countries like India. Access to safe water and a sanitary environment can easily control many gastro-intestinal infections including Cholera. In the last week of June 2021 large number of acute diarrhoeal cases were reported which was higher than expected subsequently confirmed as an outbreak of Cholera. Objective: The objectives of the study were to verify the diagnosis, identify risk factors and institute ap-propriate control measures to control the outbreak. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken to identify the time, place and personal distribution of the disease. Based on the findings of the study, sanitary survey and environmental examination a hypothesis was formulated. A case-control study was carried out to test the hypothesis. Results: A total of 158 cholera cases were reported with one death. Male and females were affected equally. All age groups affected, 18.35% of the cases were reported among children aged 0-5 years old. It was a common source epidemic and water was source of infection. The water sample reported faecal contamination. Those households not using water purification methods were 1.454 times more affected (OR=1.454) than those using water purification methods. Conclusion: The Vibrio Cholerae bacterium caused the cholera outbreak in Nadiad. Infection was caused by contaminated drinking water.

Keywords: Cholera, Outbreak, Nadiad, Waterborne, Diarrhoea, faecal contamination

DOI: 10.55489/njcm.1342022436


.